Application for Naturalization (2024)

Naturalization is the process to become a U.S. citizen if you were born outside of the United States. If you meet certain requirements, you may become a U.S. citizen either at birth or after birth. Use this form to apply for U.S. citizenship.Check your eligibility.

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Application for Naturalization (1)

Check Naturalization Eligibility

Form Details

Forms and Document Downloads

Edition Date

04/01/24. You can find the edition date at the bottom of the page on the form and instructions.

Dates are listed in mm/dd/yy format.

If you complete and print this form to mail it, make sure that the form edition date and page numbers are visible at the bottom of all pages and that all pages are from the same form edition. If any of the form’s pages are missing or are from a different form edition, we may reject your form.

If you need help downloading and printing forms, read our instructions.

Where to File

You generally have 2 options for filing your Form N-400 with USCIS:

  • Online;or
  • By mail (paper).

Filing Your Form N-400 Online

You must create a USCIS online account tofile your Form N-400 online. Having an online account will also allow you to:

  • Pay your filing fee online;
  • Check the status of your case;
  • Receive notifications and case updates;
  • View personalized case completion date estimates;
  • Respond to requests for evidence; and
  • Manage your contact information, including updating your address.

Attorneys and accredited representatives: You may also create an online account, which will allow you to manage all your clients’ applications in one place.

You cannot file online if you are requesting a fee waiver or a reduced fee; you must file a paper Form N-400.

Filing Your Form N-400 by Mail

If you submit Form N-400 on paper, we will mail you a USCIS Account Acceptance Notice with instructions on how to create an online account to track and manage your case. We will process your application even if you do not create an online account, but we encourage you to create and access your online account. We will continue to mail you copies of notifications about your case. Please check our Direct Filing Addresses for Form N-400 page for information on where to mail your application. Applications that are not submitted to the appropriate direct filing address may experience processing delays.

When to File

You may file Form N-400, Application for Naturalization, 90 calendar days before you complete your continuous residence requirement if your eligibility for naturalization is based upon being a:

  • Permanent resident for at least 5 years; or
  • Permanent resident for at least 3 years if you are married to a US citizen.

Please see our USCIS Early Filing Calculator page for additional information.

Filing Fee

You can find the filing fee for Form N-400 by visiting our Fee Schedule page.

If you file your Form N-400 by mail (paper), you can pay the fee with a money order, personal check, or cashier’s check orby credit cardor debit card usingForm G-1450, Authorization for Credit Card Transactions. If you pay by check, you must make your check payable to the U.S. Department of Homeland Security.

When you send a payment, you agree to pay for a government service. Filing fees are final and non-refundable, regardless of any action we take on your application, petition, or request, or if you withdraw your request.If you pay by credit card or debit card, you cannot later dispute the payment. Use our Fee Calculator to help determine your fee.

If you are submitting multiple forms, pay each filing fee separately. We are transitioning to electronically processing immigration benefit requests, which requires us to use multiple systems to process your package. We may reject your entire package if you submit a single, combined payment for multiple forms.

Did you know? USCIS will automatically extend the validity of your Permanent Resident Card (commonly called a Green Card) for up to 24 months after you properly apply for naturalization. This update is expected to help naturalization applicants who experience longer processing times, because they will receive this automatic extension of lawful permanent resident status and may not need to file Form I-90, Application to Replace Permanent Resident Card (Green Card). See more informationhere.

Checklist of Required Initial Evidence (for informational purposes only)

Please do not submit this checklist with your Form N-400. The checklist is an optional tool to use as you prepare your form but does not replace statutory, regulatory, and form instruction requirements. We recommend that you review these requirements before completing and submitting your form.Do not send original documents unless specifically requested in the form instructions or applicable regulations.

If you submit any documents (copies or original documents, if requested) in a foreign language, you must include a full English translation along with a certification from the translator verifying that the translation is complete and accurate, and that the translator is competent to translate from the foreign language into English.

Form N-400 Checklist of Required Documents

Basis for Filing

Documentation

All applicants must provide (if applicable)
  • LPR Card (Green Card): A copy of your Permanent Resident Card (also known as a Green Card) (both sides)
  • Form N-648, Medical Certification for Disability Exceptions: If you have a physical or developmental disability or mental impairment that prevents you from complying with the English language and/or civics requirements for naturalization, submit a completed Form N-648 to request an exception to the English language and/or civics tests.
  • Marital Status: Provide current marriage certificate and any divorce decree, annulment decree, or death certificate showing that your prior marriages were terminated (if applicable).
  • Good Moral Character:

    Documentation of crimes and offenses: If You Have EVER:You Must Provide:
    Been arrested or detained for any reason anywhere in the world and NO CHARGES WERE FILED.
    1. An arrest report; and
    2. An official statement from the arresting agency or applicable court confirming that no charges were filed.
    Been convicted or placed in an alternative sentence program (such as diversion, deferred prosecution, withheld adjudication, deferred adjudication) or rehabilitative program (including a drug treatment or community service program).
    1. The sentencing record for each incident; and
    2. Evidence that you completed your alternative sentencing or rehabilitative programs.
    Been arrested or detained for any reason anywhere in the world and CHARGES WERE FILED.
    1. Documentation of all arrest reports, charging documents, court dispositions, sentencing reports, and any other relevant documents; and
    2. Any additional evidence that you would like us to consider concerning the circ*mstances of your arrests or convictions.

    NOTE: If you were sentenced to jail or prison or received an alternative sentence or probation, you must also provide evidence to show that you completed your period of jail, prison, alternative sentence, or probation.

    Been convicted or placed in an alternative sentence program (such as diversion, deferred prosecution, withheld adjudication, deferred adjudication) or rehabilitative program (including a drug treatment or community service program).
    1. The sentencing record for each incident; and
    2. Evidence that you completed your alternative sentencing or rehabilitative programs.
    Been convicted and sentenced (including if your sentence was suspended, or you were placed on probation or parole).
    1. The sentencing record for each incident; and
    2. Evidence that you completed your sentence, such as probation or parole records.
    Had any arrest or conviction vacated, set aside, sealed, expunged, or otherwise removed from your record, or received a pardon.
    1. A motion to vacate and court order vacating, setting aside, sealing, expunging, or otherwise removing the arrest or conviction from your record;
    2. An application or petition for a pardon and final decision granting your application or petition for a pardon; or
    3. A statement from the court that no record exists of your arrest or conviction.
    Been in a traffic incident.

    Documentation of traffic incidents only if the incident:

    1. Involved alcohol or drugs;
    2. Led to an arrest; or
    3. Seriously injured another person.
    Been ordered to pay a fine, make restitution, or have your wages garnished.
    1. Documentation of the order to pay a fine, restitution, or garnish wages; and
    2. Documentation that you have paid the required sum or evidence of current payment.
    • If taxes are owed, a signed agreement from the IRS or state or local tax office showing you have filed a tax return and have arranged to pay the taxes you owe;
    • Evidence of child support (if applicable):
      • Canceled checks or money order receipts;
      • A court or agency document showing child support payments;
      • Evidence of wage garnishments; or
      • A notarized letter from the parent or guardian who cares for your children.
  • Continuous Residence and Physical Presence: If you have taken any trips outside the United States that lasted more than 6 months but less than 1 year, provide evidence that you maintained your continuous residence in the United States for the required statutory period. Evidence may include, but is not limited to:
    • Rent or mortgage statements, or pay statements;
    • Bank, credit card, or loan statements showing regular transactions;
    • Proof of car registration and insurance;
    • Your passport showing entry and exit stamps;
    • IRS tax transcripts; and
    • Any other document that shows that you maintained your residence in the United States.
  • Selective Service: If you were required to but did not register with the Selective Service System before you turned 26 years of age, and you are currently over 26 years of age but under 31 years of age (or under 29 years of age if filing based on marriage to a U.S. citizen):
    • Status information letter from the Selective Service; and
    • A statement regarding your reasons for failing to register.
Applicants who need assistance from legal guardian, surrogate or designated representative
  • Provide a court order authorizing the legal guardian or surrogate to exercise authority over the applicant’s affairs; or
  • Evidence of an authorized designated representative who is the primary custodial caregiver and who takes responsibility for the applicant, such as:
    • School records, hospital records, income tax returns (records showing that a person is an authorized representative before the IRS in connection with the applicant's federal tax matters); or
    • Social Security documents (for example, enrollment in the US SSA Representative's Payment Program), or affidavits (written sworn statements from other family members or person who have personal knowledge of the familial relationship between the applicant and the person seeking to represent the applicant indicating the person is responsible for the primary custodial care of the applicant); and
  • Documentation of family relationship if the designated representative is not the legal guardian or surrogate;
  • Form N-648 certified by medical professional of inability to take the Oath. Note: You may also provide a separate attestation from the medical professional but this is not necessary if you are providing the Form N-648 with the information.
Spouse of U.S. Citizen
  • Continuous Residence and physical presence documentation for the last 3 years if you have taken any trips outside the United States during the last 3 years that lasted more than 6 months but less than 1 year. Evidence may include, but is not limited to:
    • Rent or mortgage statements, or pay statements;
    • Bank, credit card, or loan statements showing regular transactions;
    • Proof of car registration and insurance;
    • Your passport showing entry and exit stamps;
    • IRS tax transcripts; and
    • Any other document that shows that you maintained your residence in the United States.
  • A copy of your marriage certificate;
  • Evidence of U.S. citizenship for spouse for the last 3 years, generally a copy of your spouse’s:
    • U.S. birth certificate;
    • Certificate of Naturalization;
    • Certificate of Citizenship;
    • Biographical page of their current U.S. passport; or
    • Report of Birth Abroad of a Citizen of the United States of America (Form FS-240).
  • Evidence of termination of all prior marriages for you and your spouse, such as divorce decree(s), annulment(s), and death certificate(s).
  • If Spouse of U.S. Citizen in Qualified Employment Outside the United States (Part 1,Item Number 1.D. on the Form), provide evidence of your U.S. citizen spouse’s employment abroad:
    • The employer’s name and nature of the employer’s business;
    • The nature of the work the U.S. citizen spouse is performing;
    • Documentation to establish the employing entity is:
      1. The U.S. government;
      2. An American Institution of Research recognized as such by the attorney general (see www.uscis.gov/air);
      3. A public international organization in which the United States participates by treaty or statute;
      4. An American firm or corporation that is engaged in whole or in part in the development of U.S. foreign trade and commerce; or
      5. A religious denomination or an interdenominational mission organization and your spouse is performing the ministerial or priestly functions of the religious denomination or is serving as a missionary, brother, nun, or sister for the religious denomination or interdenominational mission.
    • Your U.S. citizen spouse’s travel orders which include your name as a spouse (if applicable);
    • Documentation to establish your spouse’s qualified employment outside the U.S. is scheduled to last for at least 1 year from the date you file Form N-400; and
    • A typed or printed statement of your intent to reside outside the U.S. with your spouse and to live in the U.S. immediately after your spouse’s qualified employment outside the U.S. ends.
  • If Spouse of a Member of the U.S. armed forces:
    • Documentation you are authorized to accompany the member under the member’s official orders;
    • Documentation of military service of the member of the U.S. armed forces; and
    • Two passport-style photographs (if you reside outside the United States)
Violence Against Women Act (VAWA)
  • Evidence of the spouse’s U.S. citizenship;
  • Evidence of marriage to the U.S. citizen (VAWA applicants do not have to still be married to the U.S. citizen at the time of filing the naturalization application); and
  • Divorce or separation or marital union is not required if you obtained LPR status as the spouse, former spouse, or intended spouse of a U.S. citizen who subjected you to battery or extreme cruelty.
Military Service
  • Form N-426, Request for Certification of Military or Naval Service (if currently serving in the U.S. armed forces);
  • DD Form 214, NGB Form 22, or discharge orders (if separated from the U.S. armed forces);
  • A copy of your official military orders (if applicable);
  • Two passport-style photographs (if you reside outside the United States); and
  • No documentation of continuous residence or physical presence necessary if currently serving during a designated period of hostilities.

Form Filing Tips

You cannot file online if you are requesting a fee waiver or a reduced fee; you must file a paper Form N-400.

  • If you are paying the full filing fee:
    • Select “No” in Part 10, Item Number 1
    • Skip to Part 11
    • Submit $760 if filing by paper, or $710 if filing online
  • If you are applying for a reduced fee:
    • Select “Yes” in Part 10, Item Number 1
    • Complete the rest of Part 10
    • Submit $380 and documentation to support the reduced fee
  • If you are applying for a fee waiver:
    • You are not required to complete Part 10, Item Number 1.
    • Do not submit a fee, and instead submit a properly completed Form I-912, Request for Fee Waiver, or written request, and documentation to support the fee waiver request.

Filing Tips:Review ourTips for Filing Forms by Mailpage for information on how to ensure we will accept your form.

Don’t forget to sign your form.We will reject any unsigned form.

Special Instructions

E-Notification: If you want to receive an email and/or text message that we have accepted your form at a USCIS lockbox, complete Form G-1145, E-Notification of Application/Petition Acceptance, and clip it to the first page of your form.

  • Biometrics: Applicants who file Form N-400 must generally submit biometrics unless we waive the requirement. An applicant who is required to appear at an application support center (ASC) to submit biometrics will receive a notice of their scheduled appointment. If we determine you are eligible for naturalization, we may use the photograph taken at the ASC on your Certificate of Naturalization. Therefore, we recommend that, on the day of your ASC appointment, you dress in clothing that is acceptable for display on your Certificate of Naturalization. We will not reject a photograph based solely on your desire to modify the photograph shown on your certificate.
  • Photographs: Based on processing needs, you may need to submit physical passport photographs after you have already filed your Form N-400. We will send you a request for physical photographs with instructions on how to submit them.
  • Attorney or representative: You may be represented, at no expense to the U.S. government, by an attorney or other duly authorized or accreditedrepresentative.Your representative must submit Form G-28, Notice of Entry of Appearance as Attorney or Accredited Representative, with your Form N-400. They may also submit Form G-28 at the time of your interview.
  • Lost or Expiring Permanent Resident Card (Green Card): Effective Dec. 12, 2022, after you properly file Form N-400, you will receive a Form N-400 receipt notice that automatically extends your Green Card for 2 years from the “Card Expires” date on your Green Card. This notice will serve as proof that we have extended your Green Card, which is evidence of your lawful permanent resident status. The notice should be presented together with your Green Card. If you lose your Green Card, you generally must still file Form I-90 even if you have applied for naturalization. If you have a Form N-400 receipt notice that automatically extends the validity of your Green Card, but your notice has been destroyed or lost, then you generally must file Form I-90 to renew your expiring Green Card.

Biometrics for Service Members

We will review your application and conduct required background and security checks, which may include you providing us with your fingerprints. This can be done in 1 of these ways:

  • If you were fingerprinted for a previous immigration application, we will use these fingerprints, if available.
  • If you are stationed outside the United States, you may submit 2 properly completed FD-258 fingerprint cards and 2 passport-style photos taken by the military police or officials with the Department of Homeland Security at aU.S. embassy or U.S. consulate.
  • You may also submit your fingerprints at an application support center before or after you file your Form N-400. Be sure to include your A-Number and show your unexpired military ID card or Delayed Entry Program ID card.

If you have case specific questions, you may contact theMilitary Help Lineat 877-CIS-4MIL (877-247-4645,TTY: 800-877-8339) ormilitaryinfo@uscis.dhs.gov.

Related Links

Learn About Citizenship

  • Citizenship Resource Center
  • Citizenship and Naturalization
  • How Do I Apply for Citizenship? (PDF, 2.21 MB)
  • A Guide to Naturalization

Citizenship Tools and Resources

  • USCIS Early Filing Calculator
  • Practice Civics Test
  • Preparing for the Oath
  • Eligible to Naturalize Fact Sheets
  • Fact Sheets Promoting Citizenship

File Online

  • How to Create a USCIS Online Account
  • Tips for Filing Forms Online
  • Online Filing for Attorneys and Accredited Representatives

Paying with a Credit Card

  • Pay Your N-400 Application Fee with Your Credit Card
  • Form G-1450, Authorization for Credit Card Transactions

Prepare for the Interview and Test

  • The Naturalization Interview and Test
  • Study for the Test
  • Check for Test Updates
  • Citizenship Multilingual Resources

Filing Tips and Guidance

Policy and Guidance

  • USCIS Policy Manual, Volume 12, Citizenship and Naturalization
  • Guidance: Group Processing Events
  • Form N-400 Frequently Asked Questions (PDF, 229.25 KB)
Application for Naturalization (2024)
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